Cooking table for legumes

Legumes

Quantity before cooking

Soaking time

Approximate cooking time

Cooking yield

Adzuki beans

200 g (1 cup)

8 to 12 hours

40 minutes

415 g (2 1/2 cups)

Lima Beans

200 g (1 cup)

8 to 12 hours

30 minutes

415 g (2 1/2 cups)

Mung beans

200 g (1 cup)

30 minutes

30 minutes

415 g (2 1/2 cups)

Red beans

180 g (1 cup)

8 to 12 hours

1 hour

415 g (2 1/2 cups)

Black beans

200 g (1 cup)

8 to 12 hours

45 minutes

415 g (2 1/2 cups)

Red Lentils

200 g (1 cup)

30 minutes

15 minutes

450 g (2 1/2 cups)

Brown lentils

200 g (1 cup)

30 minutes

20 minutes

400 g (2 3/4 cups)

Chickpeas

200 g (1 cup)

12 hours

60 to 90 minutes

450 g (3 cups)

Here are the main rules for cooking legumes successfully:

  1. For almost all legume varieties, soak them 8 to 12 hours in four parts water. It is important to always use non-chlorinated water (filtered or spring water) for food preparation. However, for mung beans, brown lentils and red lentils, they can be soaked only 30 minutes, as they cook much faster than their counterparts.
  2. The soaking stage is important because it facilitates digestion and allows to soften the legumes, thus reducing the cooking time. In addition, as in the case of cereals, legumes naturally contain phytic acid. This acid combines with certain minerals present in the human body such as calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc. Following the ingestion of phytic acid, insoluble phytates are formed, which are eliminated by the organism with the aforementioned minerals to which they are combined; this causes some kind of demineralization in the organism. Soaking removes the phytic acid and then allows a good assimilation of the minerals present in the legumes.
  3. After the soaking time, simply rinse the legumes because the soaking water is hard to digest.
  4. Place in a saucepan and cover with fresh water. Add a few bay leaves or a piece of kombu seaweed; This will reduce gas and bloating sometimes linked to the consumption of legumes. You can also change the water after 30 minutes of cooking, to facilitate digestion and reduce gas production.
  5. Bring to a boil and simmer over low heat, stirring occasionally during cooking. Refer to the cooking times given in the table. These times are approximate since they can vary according to the freshness of the legumes. In the fall, they will cook faster and as the rest of the year moves on, the more time they will require to cook.
  6. They will be ready when tender to the tooth. When cooking legumes for later use in a different recipe where they will continue to cook, just slightly decrease the cooking time.

And remember, always think of cooking a little bit more than what the recipe calls for. Cooked legumes can be kept for 1 week in the refrigerator. They can also be frozen. This way, you will always have some at your fingertips, which facilitates their integration into your daily menu!

Cooking table for grains and cereals

Grain or cereal

Quantity before cooking

Amount of water

for cooking

Cooking time

Cooking  yield

Millet

200 g (1 cup)

500 ml (2 cups)

15 minutes

600 g (4 cups)

Quinoa

200 g (1 cup)

500 ml (2 cups)

15 minutes

600 g (4 cups)

Brown basmati rice

180 g (1 cup)

500 ml (2 cups)

45 minutes

500 g (3 1/2 cups)

Buckwheat

180 g (1 cup)

375 ml (1 1/2 cup)

15 minutes

480 g (3 cups)

You can also soak your grains and cereals before cooking them. This will facilitate the assimilation of all the minerals they contain (see note 2, cooking section of legumes).

COOKING GRAINS AND CEREALS

  1. Rinse and drain grains or cereals before cooking. It is important to measure the amount to cook before rinsing.
  2. Measure the quantity of water required for cooking according to the quantity of grain or cereal measured by volume (i.e. using a measuring cup). At the cooking stage, measuring in grams only would distort the amount of water required since the volume differs from the actual weight.
  3. Millet, quinoa and brown basmati rice: We cook them in double their volume in water. For example, 1 cup of brown rice is cooked in 2 cups of water.

Buckwheat: cook in one and a half times its volume in water. For example, for

1 cup of buckwheat, cook in 1 1/2 cups of water.

At the time of cooking:

  1. Millet, quinoa or buckwheat: Put the desired quantity in an average saucepan with the volume of water required for cooking. If desired, add a little olive oil and salt. *
  2. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer over low heat for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes with a closed lid. Remove the lid and aerate with a fork.
  3. Brown basmati rice: Put the volume of water required for cooking in an average saucepan and bring to a boil. If desired, add a little olive oil and salt. *
  4. When the water is boiling, add the rice and bring the water to a boil again. Cover and simmer over low heat for 40 to 45 minutes, or until all water has been absorbed. Remove from heat and let stand for 5 minutes with a closed lid. Remove the lid and aerate with a fork.

* For my part, I use the following rule: for each cup of grains or cereals, add a 1/4 tsp of salt and 1 tsp of olive oil.